Galloping Towards Sex In The Real World

Cindy Gallop has spent her life as an agent provocateur, first in the advertising industry (helping create memorable and sexy communications for brands like Levi’s) and now as a brand unto herself (as a feminist who aims to completely re-frame the dialog surrounding sex, porn, and the convoluted relationship between the two). Take a look at her terse, witty four-minute talk that dropped a bomb on the 2009 TED conference, and here’s a bit of what you’ll hear from this unfazeable 50-ish woman in black leather pants:

“I date younger men, predominantly men in their twenties. And when I date younger men, I have sex with younger men. And when I have sex with younger men, I encounter, very directly and personally, the real ramifications of the creeping ubiquity of hard-core pornography in our culture.”

With that introductory salvo, Gallop introduced MakeLoveNotPorn.com, a site that gained much attention for focusing on a few pithy but crucial nuggets of content – the differences between Porn World sex and Real World sex. Realizing that hardcore porn has become the default sex-ed of a new generation, the site’s mission was to debunk the myth that what happens on screen is what should happen in the bedroom (or poolside, or the stairwell, or wherever). Gallop is quick to point out that her stance is not anti-porn. “The issue,” she says, “is a lack of counterpoint to porn, in the form of an open, healthy dialog in our society around sex and porn, which would enable more people to bring a real-world mindset to the viewing of what is artificial and non-reality-based entertainment.”

Gallop’s latest effort to move the needle towards reality is MakeLoveNotPorn.tv, a new video service that lives by the rallying cry, “Pro-sex. Pro-porn. Pro-knowing the difference.” Essentially, the site aims to broker a market between real people who want to submit sex videos and real people who want to view a more realistic sexual experience. It even has a semi-altruistic business model as the video creators get a share of the profits from their contribution. Voila! All our libidinal, exhibitionistic, and voyeuristic impulses wrapped neatly in a post-modern internet-capitalist package. She explains the concept brilliantly in this provocative interview on Whack! Magazine. Quite frankly, we can’t wait to see what turns up in this frolicsome new forum.

And for a another insightful glimpse of its articulate creator, see Gallop’s latest interview in one our favorite video blogs, “That’s What She Said” Project. What she said there is simple yet so profound:”Things would be so much better if people just thought about sex as personality. Our sexuality is part of who we are.” Indeed.  With this type of intellectual energy  fueling the site, Cindy’s vision of Make Love Not Porn is sure to be provocative on many levels.